Being scared of zero comments


It can be disappointing and disheartening to spend time on posts for your blog, if there is no feedback from commenters. Makes me feel good to know that people are taking time out of their busy lives to type out a few words, and I always read and reply to comments on moviesandsongs365.

But I think I'm slowly but surely becoming increasingly comfortable with just getting on with my life. "The big zero" as I like to call it, is no big deal, so long as you are happy with the effort you have put in to the blog. You can’t force anyone to be interested, right?
There are times when I only visit other blogs, in order for them to leave comments on my site. Pretty selfish I guess.

I began to realize it was probably not me that was at fault, but the system of commenting in the blogosphere has flaws. When you only leave a comment to get something in return, then you are doing it for your own sake. It’s like a girl once said to me, do you only talk to women who you are interested in dating, in other words, have a hidden agenda.
The best friends in life, at least in my opinion, are those who are selfless, who don’t expect anything in return. I don’t know if that is possible in the blogosphere.


Think about a volunteer helping in the 3rd world, you wouldn’t like them, if they told you they were doing it to advance their career and for fame and respect. But if they stated they were doing it because they were sensitive to the suffering and wanted to make a small difference, we would probably applaud them.

I guess that’s my problem with the blogosphere, a lot of comments are selfishly motivated, and not selfless.

Do we write posts so that other people gain something valuable, or do we write for our own sake for comments and popularity? Is there any point posting on a blog if nobody comments, should it then just be an offline journal? Would we put such an effort into the writing if it was offline material? Do we put too much emphasize on comments, and less effort into the posts, if comments begin to wane? Or the opposite, devote more time and energy out of a feeling of insecurity? Do we dumb down posts and make them more mainstream to attract commenters, or does it work the other way, spend hours on a piece because we want to impress and stand-out?

As a blogger, I find this discussion fascinating... I am grateful of self-help how-to-blog articles, but occasionally disagree. For example saying: "people don't bother with a site if they see a blog with no comments". I find this offensive and often feel the opposite way, if I see some obscure lonely blog, I want to leave a friendly comment to keep up their spirits. And sometimes a brief moment of kindness and support can make their day, and be the beginning of a beautiful friendship. I also find it a little unsettling and controlling that there is a formula of the right way to be...


I just think you will be a lot happier and less stressed if you stop being scared of the big zero. You can be happy, even with zero comments. All the hours you are chasing comments in a year, could the time be used in a more constructive way? Even if it’s almost impossible given the way the blogging community is put together, a selfless comment is a lot more appreciated on my blog.

At the end of the day, life is mostly too complex to separate selfless and selfish behaviour.

I’m not saying my think piece is right, and everyone else is wrong, that would be arrogant. I’m not asking you to change your ways, only to pause for a few seconds, and give a few thoughts to commenting and what you think about it.


Haha, I just realized this piece sounds like an article Sarah Jessica Parker would type in Sex And The City. Whatever! I love comments (maybe I love them too much). You can become addicted to comments, you can become addicted to anything...

From Chris, moviesandsongs365

65 comments:

  1. I just HAD to comment on this post, didn't I? :)
    I think you're onto something important here, honestly. I get so sad when I see bloggers fretting over statistics and numbers of comments rather than enjoying the ride. There's no need to be scared away from a blog with few visitors or comments. You can look at it from the other side: you've been fortunate and privilaged to stumble upon a hidden gem in a far distant corner of the blogosphere. Many people chase for exclusivity when it comes to what they read, what movies they see etc, so why not do this when it comes to blogs? A blog with few comments is for the blog gourmets. :)

    Leaving comments just to pull traffic to your own blog is really a bad idea.

    Commenting is a way of reaching out, yes, but you're at the other blog as a guest, not to steal the attention.

    cheers

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    1. @Jessica: True, bloggers need to focus on the positive and enjoy the ride. I was trying to think of any selfless people, and all I could come up with are our parents(but even they give love in the hope of it being returned). So maybe I have to just live a life and be less cynical. Is easier said than done. Sound advice, thanks

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  2. Excellent topic Chris.

    The way I see it is, when you are first starting out, commenting on other peoples blogs is an excellent way to get noticed and get some traffic your way. Sure it's a bit selfish but as long as you leave something thoughtful that shows you actually read what the person wrote and don't beg for followbacks or post spammy links, then I think it's fine. You've got to get yourself known somehow, and the truth is I've discovered most of my favorite blogs/bloggers that way.

    I admit it's always nice to wake up and see a pile of new comments and hits but that isn't something I worry too much about, because many of the movies I review are ones that not many other bloggers have seen, so I know they won't attract very many comments or views. I just keep covering what I care about, and continually try and improve my writing, and hopefully eventually more people take notice and stick around.

    PS. Please consider turning off the word verification required to comment here. It really annoys most readers (myself included), and doesn't really do much to combat spam. Also you might find more people willing to leave comments after it's gone.

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    1. Thanks BT. Yeah, I've been through the early stages of starting out blogging, several of my early commenters and followers stopped bloggging.
      I agree, a great way to start the day, when your mailbox is full! of course as you allude to, is not the be all and end all. Real joy comes from our real life ( :

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    2. Wow, looks like you created a monster with this post. I just came back to see how things were going and it looks like you've started a great discussion here. Just don't be disappointed when the next one doesn't reach 50+ comments :)

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    3. @Bonjour Tristesse: ha ha, yeah, perhaps I should retire from blogging, can only go downhill from here! Just kidding, I'll stick around, of course. ( ;

      Plenty of good advice from this discussion, awesome!

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  3. I think you worry too much about it - comments or no comments, you get to share your thoughts - that's what blogging is all about. And I agree that word verification is a horrible device.

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    1. @Sati: Good observation, I worry way too much. I should look at the big picture ( :

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  4. What the above commenters say. Turn that word verification. If you don't know how to do it, read Nostra's post about it.

    http://myfilmviews.com/2012/05/09/why-commenting-on-blogs-can-be-so-frustrating-sometimes/

    Also: If you want comments, don't forget to always, always reply to every comment you get. If you don't reply, people will stop commenting.

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    1. @Jessica: The word verifation was turned off a few hours ago, thanks for the link!
      I don't respond to comments immediately like some busy blogs, as I want to relax from internet and texting as well.

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    2. Oh I didn't mean that you need to reply to comments instantly! I try to do it the same day but sometimes it takes longer. Eventually I will reply though. Take your time. But show that you have noticed the comment and appreciate it.

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    3. @Jessica: I get your point, a reply to a comment is better late, than never! Thanks for being the first to comment on what has become a surprisingly lively debate!

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    4. You know... most of the people who comment are bloggers. And if there's anything bloggers love to talk about, it's blogging. When we see a chance to exchange thoughts about this, we grab it! It's a bit of navelgazing I reckon, but there's nothing wrong about that. We enjoy it! :)

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    5. @Jessica: Due to the overwhelming response, I'm considering a sequel to this piece for the future ( :

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  5. This is the first post I've read where I've actually read all the comments!
    I had to read your post and as Jessica said, also had to comment on it. Sometimes I find myself getting depressed because I'm really chasing after comments and stats, and I write a post even though I don't feel ready yet, or try to comment on a lot of other blogs. Yes, it can be helpful to pull yourself together and you know, forget laziness, but the line is easily crossed. It's like sports - it's good to have motivation and do it regularly, but you can easily push yourself too much and get hurt/ injured.

    I hope the experience of reading this post will help me relax more about the subject of comments - actually I have become a little more relaxed, because I've noticed that I feel so much better when I write a post that I want to write. However, I still get a little frustrated when I get zero comments. Doesn't happen very often, but this month there was one post without comments...
    Anyway, I have to say: great post, inspiring and intelligent :).

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    1. @Mette: writing for a blog, sports, watching movies, everything in moderation is a good rule in life! A zero is frustating, but as I wrote we can't force friends into reading/commenting. At times the process of writing is just a way of getting something off your chest(I know selfish again, kinda)
      Glad it was an inspiring article, thanks for reading!

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  6. Chris, I really enjoyed this post, and I'm not just saying that to get comments back! (: I've been doing my blog for a little over a year, and I've found that it's impossible to predict which posts will generate discussion. Sometimes I write something that I'm really proud of and hear nothing, and others that I'm not as excited about get responses. Like you say in the post, I think the main thing is to do the blog for yourself and not worry. However, it's tough to not want to have interaction with others and to get feedback.

    I'll admit that I get a bit silly in looking at numbers, and I've tried to do less of that this year. It isn't even really about getting more hits to gain any specific reward. Everyone is looking for personal justification on what they're doing, and I think it functions that way sometimes for blogs. This isn't why I write, though, so why should it matter?

    In terms of commenting on other blogs, I've pulled back a lot and am only writing on posts that strike a nerve in some way. There's so much information out there that I've cut down the number of blogs I read to focus on the ones I really like. I now actually have the time to read the posts closely because the volume isn't so crazy. It's a tricky balance because there's so much out there, but I think it's the way to go.

    Sorry for the long comment. Excellent job!

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    1. Thanks for your generous selfless comment, Dan! True enough, impossible to predict which posts will generate discussion/comments.
      See, the problem I have with that argument about writing for yourself is that there has to be a reason for posting it online(and the only reason for me is for others to give feedback, and then I'm back to square one again!)Not worrying is the key, as you say ( :

      I also glance at stats(with the new blogger interface its impossible not to notice), the numbers are unimportant, because the reviews where I put the movie poster at the top get 100s of empty hits with no additional comments, seems to have nothing to do with the writing, mostly the images.

      Information overload, I wrote a project about that at uni! That's why by choice I turn off my cell and laptop at times, a risk of turning into a person who can't concentrate reading a book, if you are constantly "available" and "plugged in".

      I follow far too many blogs, and after my recent back injury scare I'm cutting down on commenting too.

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  7. I have to admit to getting a bit giddy when I see comments but I also think that as long as I can see from Google Analytics that people read my posts and continue to read then they must be vaguely happy, whether they comment or not. I also have to admit to some commenting to get noticed but as time goes on I make comments whenever I have something to say or have really enjoyed a post. I quite like the idea of finding blogs that never seem to get a comment and posting one. That could be my job for the weekend...

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    1. Well if you are a happy blogger, Keith, then that's what's important. This debate sure gets people thinking! A blatant call for attention on my part, pretty sad really ( :
      I admire sites that don't need comments to keep posting. Being the good samaritan in the blogosphere is a sign of character ( :

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  8. This is a great piece, and I've often wondered the same thing. It's an insecurity thing; sometimes you just want to be accepted in the movie blogging community. You may think: The more comments you receive, the more you are "accepted." But I don't believe that to be true, actually. I think it all comes to down why you are writing a blog in the first place. For me, it's an outlet. It's a journal. It's a hobby. I used to get excited when my stats are high and the feedback is coming through, but I've pulled back on that. Now I just write when/what I want, and comment on other blogs when I feel compelled to say something.

    If you're looking to be Mr. Popular, this whole venture could be a very emotional roller coaster ride. And for some, that's all part of the thrill.

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    1. Thank you very much, Dave. First time I've seen you round here, I thought this could spark a debate among bloggers and indeed it has. I agree to a certain extent about being accepted, I once read somewhere that a published author doesn't really exist, unless there are readers, and the same goes for the blogosphere. If there are no comments, I assume there are no readers.
      I also write what I want, and post reviews of movies that are not brand new, because I feel everyone else is taking care of the new releases. Though I do occasionally review new films, for the purpose of being part of the community discussion.
      I don't think my nerves could stand to be mr popular 365 days a year! I'm happy with a few comments, but would shudder if I got 1000 replys ( :

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    2. To date, this post has 34 comments on it, more than any post my blog has ever received. I think you should be happy with your "numbers!"

      Of course, not that the numbers matter, right? Ha!

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    3. @Dave: Yes, lucky me! I'm beginning to run out of things to say about this matter actually. Nice problem to have, I guess ( :

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  9. I can say that you really should not care about comments ans stats, but really who am I kidding ? It is almost impossible to ignore them completely, especially in initial stages when the doubt if anyone cares about it or not definitely creeps in. But, some times you have to keep going.

    To tell you the truth, I don't have a problem with writing a post on something that will attract lot of comments as long as you don't pass on something YOU WANT to write just because it will probably not get many comments or views. If you are doing this, I think you are fine.

    Nice topic for a post Chris !!

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    1. SDG: Yes persistence in life is important(without being foolhardy of couse). Then again if you get no comments then you begin wondering if it should be an entry in your private journal offline, or on your private ipod. If you never give up, then you never lose, which is a quote I love ( :
      There is a fine line between writing for an audience online, and writing because it has a personal fascination.

      I think it was the documentary about Stanley Kubrick ,A Life in Pictures (2001) , that had Jack Nicholson discussing the slightly paranoid director, Kubrick’s love of animals, because they didn’t have a secret agenda! I am probably also cynical in that way, thinking bloggers are selfishly motivated, I hope I'm wrong ( :

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  10. I love getting comments, as helpful/positive feedback from my readers is what helps keep me interested in blogging. I don't expect a bunch of comments on every post, but it's nice to know that people are reading and also willing to take time to say so. Ultimately, however, the goal should be to produce quality content. If the writing is consistently good, people will start to notice.

    I tend to comment if a post really catches my eye, but I also like to visit some of my favorite blogs and support them when they post new content. It really is a lot of fun interacting with others in the blogging community, especially with some of the awesome blogathons that go around (such as Nostra's Best Actor relay race).

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    1. Thanks for your thoughts, Eric! It's easy to go down the road of being too calculated, visiting blogs regardless of the quality purely because you want them to return comments on your own site. Comments or no comments,sometimes the best articles you find are all about the writing and insight.
      As I said, if there are no comments, I assume there are no readers.
      The trouble with relying on comments is that when they stop, you become frustrated. You have to find enjoyment in writing regardless of comments, I think.
      There was a brief period in my life when I decided to experiment and have zero expectations of other people, and anything anyone said to me was like a present, to try and avoid disappointment. It was kind of dumb,insulting and pessimistic, because it insinuates that nobody cares, which they do ( :

      I agree, interacting in the blogosphere is half the fun!

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  11. I generate very few comments on my site, but it doesn't bother me at all. I rarely comment on other peoples sites, but I read a lot of blog posts. Some of my favourite blogs get almost no comments at all - and by that I mean they post every day and get 1 or 2 comments a month. But the quality of the writing is so high,the blog never looks like it is lacking anything to me.
    I guess if my traffic wasn't building fast I might be disheartened - but because it is, I don't worry about comments.
    It helps to dig deep and think about why you are doing what you are doing. I have several goals for my blog - only one of which is to build a following. Another of my goals was to put me in touch with artists I admire by reviewing their work, and that has worked so spectacularly that I feel like my blog is a massive success. Honestly, when a musician, artist or writer I admire sends me an email about my review I nearly pass out from the excitement. This means a lot more to me than comments. I only want comments if they are engaging in the post. I never comment on other blogs in order to receive traffic. To be honest, it never occurred to me. (That seems like a false economy)

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    1. Thanks for chipping in, Lisa. The truth is coming out now ( : I suppose nobody is perfect. We all want attention and to be noticed, and are all a little selfish sometimes.

      As I said above, I don't see the point of posting online for any other reason than sharing, feedback and interaction. If I just wrote all this for myself, then it would be offline. I admit I have kind of lost track of why I blog, I should give it some extra thought. The main motivation was to find others who have similar interests as I do.

      Probably you have a slightly different approach as a writer, you are not a LAMB member, as far as I know.
      That must be fascinating getting a response from the artists, I wish they wrote to me too ( :

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    2. Yes - I'm not going to pretend I can just blog into a vacuum... I can't, and I get very excited to see stats rise. And I seriously didn't mean any criticism toward you at all. I think you are right, being a writer means I stand in a different place all together - I guess that is why a lot of this seems a bit foreign to me. My target audience (other artists, readers and publishing industry) almost definitely wouldn't comment. I think that makes a difference for me. But don't think I don't need my own version of feedback - we all do. And I loved what you said about community.

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    3. (and no - I'm not a Lamb member - he he he)

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    4. @Lisa: No, you didn't offend me at all. My purpose of this article was to be critical of the overall system of commenting, not any particular individuals.

      LAMB or no LAMB, keep doing what makes you happy!

      Look forward to your response on the Cafe De Flore review at your site. Hope you didn't miss my comment ( :

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  12. Bloody hell! It's definitely struck a chord! Look at all these comments! I started out commenting in that hope that people might pop over to my blog if I commented on theirs but now I depend on other blogs for my daily fix of movie news!

    I used to go straight to Empire magazine's website every morning to see what's going on. Now I get it all from other blogs! I love it! And I try to comment on everything I read because people spend a lot of time writing this and it saddens me that people don't bother to comment if they read your stuff.

    However if I ever miss commenting on a post, it's only because I have absolutely zilch of interest to say. That happens a lot actually but I try to just leave a little message to let the writer know I read it!

    Keep it up! Forget about how many comments/views you get and just enjoy putting it out there! And visit my site too. hahahaha sorry!

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    1. @Pete: I will try and keep it up, but won't post longer reviews until aforementioned back/leg issues are healed.

      Look out for monthly movie recaps, and weekly music ( :

      I agree, that it is courteous to leave a comment on posts of interest, as the person has spent time and effort writing the piece. But of course you can't comment on everything, you would go nuts! ( :

      haha, good joke! ( :

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  13. Hey, Chris. What a fantastic topic. I was once 'trapped' in that world, where I keep commenting other blog to make them come to mine. First it felt selfish, later it felt exhausting (since I don't have all the time to blog). Then I realize other blogger comment on mine with the same motive and their comments aren't thoughtful. So it felt really silly.
    I think it all comes down to the person's priority. Bloggers tend to post what they love, but some other people want to make a bigger site. Therefore they need big statistic and all. I do think statistic is important, but not the number one priority. You should always post something you enjoy, otherwise it felt like a chore. I once read someone's post about it, she said 'when blogging felt like a chore, you need to think again if that's what you want'. I really don't want another chore, haha. But still it's sucks when nobody comment, but sometimes when you write without any high expectation people have more attention.
    I didn't know that, I guess you visited mine when my post have zero comment back in the early days. Thanks so much, Chris.

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    1. Happy you enjoyed my post, Andina! In the blogosphere world it is easy to be selfish, the nature of the commenting I guess. I hope I keep posting out of enjoyment. That's my problem, I have high expectations of myself and others, and then it's easy to be disappointed, I should just relax and not worry about comments. Is only fun after all. Your blog is too good to have zero comments ( :

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    2. So sweet of you to say! I'm currently having those right now, but I've predicted it. I don't think zero comments means your blog isn't good. Sometimes it happens, some posts have lots of comments, some don't. Have a good day, Chris!

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    3. @Andina: You're welcome. Yes, is often luck! I didn't mean no comments is a bad blog ( : How many you know in the blogosphere also counts to number of comments, and if everyone can weigh in on the topic !

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  14. I know exactly how you feel man, but you're right, it simply isn't worth worrying about. I've been running my site since Sept. 2007 and I didn't get more than 10 comments A YEAR until last summer. It was frustrating, but I stuck with it, simply because I love writing about film.

    I love this site, and although I may not comment all the time, it certainly doesn't mean I'm not reading, you know?

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    1. Makes perfect sense, I realize people have busy lives and can't comment all the time on my site. As I said, I'm not trying to change anyone.

      For me, is tough to relate to "invisible" readers, I think. I suppose it's the same for everyone with a blog having to deal with this.

      10 comments A YEAR, that sucks! Glad you love my site ( :

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  15. I was so hoping that this post would have no comments lol.

    I make it a point to read and comment on other blogs, if I like what they have to say, or if I have a strong opinion about something I read. But lets face it, it takes alot of work to stay current with everyone especially the longer you are blogging.
    That being said, some of what I consider my best reviews have gotten little or no comments. On the other hand stuff I just sort of slapped together, have at times gotten more comments than I could respond to.

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    1. @3guys1movie: ha ha, that would have been ironic if a zero was still staring back at me. I was pretty sure someone would identify ( :

      It does take a lot of work comments and reading blogs, so I think the danger is to make a priority of only reading the sites who return comments(which I'm guilty of), and then you miss interesting blogs who don't comment back on my site.

      Yes, be careful what you wish for ( ;

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  16. As a lower division blogger I regularly receive no comments. If 'Into the Valley...' was a football club it'd be mid-table in the Conference North, but to be honest I really don't care. To a certain extent I don't really play the blogging game and I only link to blogs I really like and comment on posts that interest me. I still love blogging and the comments I receive from my two regular comment posters are all the sweeter. I get really giddy when I receive a comment from a new source. Just like in real life I'd rather have a few true friends than loads of acquaintances.

    And Chris, many thanks for Lene Marlin - quality stuff.

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    1. @doccortex: You and evl keith have a lot in common it would seem! I'm guessing you are family, brothers?

      A few good friends is definitely a good thing, but of course it can be a vulnerable situation putting all your eggs in one basket. Still, I'm glad you perceive me as a true friend, I'm honoured!

      No problem, Lene Marlin has a beautiful voice, and her beauty extents to more than her lyrics and singing ( ;

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  17. Chris I just had another thought about this. What about people having a lot of hoops to jump through to leave a comment? I know its a real PIA for me personally, to deal with annoying captcha or other such redonkulousness. I shouldn't have to pass a TSA screening to leave a comment.

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    1. @3guys1movie: I'm thinking the removal of captcha word verification has increased comments here at my blog, we will see, could just be a one off this week!

      PIA= pain in the ass? Not, Pakistan International Airlines, anyway!

      Funny comment, dude ( :

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  18. I know how you feel. Sometimes I read, but don't leave a comment (doesn't mean I didn't like a piece, just couldn't think of anything relevant to say!)

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    1. @Ruth: I know. There are just not enough hours in the day to read, think about, and comment on every blog out there.

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    2. @Ruth and @Alex Withrow: What you both say is important. If we look at the invisible readers of our blog in a positive way, then we won't be so cynical about zero comments. Good advice, thanks!

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  19. Well, you picked a sure fire way to get comments, didn't you?

    Like the others said, I like seeing new comments in my Inbox. I spent a lot of months with none at all, though, because my first followers were people I knew, most of whom were not into movies as much as I was. Once I got connected to more movie bloggers I started getting some.

    I don't believe in changing who I am to try to generate more traffic or comments, though. I'm not going to start posting reviews where I trash films, or write outrageous things, even though it would attract a lot more attention.

    By the way, don't let people bully you on the word verification. I had it suggested to me, too, and frankly it puzzles me. Almost every blog I follow has it, and they get tons of comments. Yes, some individuals don't like it, but should you have to pay the price of getting spammed constantly just to get a few more comments from people too impatient to take an extra few seconds? I got lots of spam at first, added the word verification, and have had a total of THREE spam comments in the 16 months since. If you don't get spam, then fine. If you do, you may have to consider turning it back on.

    The only thing that keeps me from commenting on a couple of blogs is that I've learned the people running them never respond. And I don't mean that they just don't say thank you, but that they don't even answer a follow-up question to their post.

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    1. @Chip Lary: I agree that changing who you are is unwise, you wouldn't feel comfortable blogging in the long run. Though no harm in experimenting with fresh ideas, because trying new things can help you grow as a person(in real life and in the blogosphere)

      hmm, I'm sorry to hear people are sometimes not answering your comments . Maybe it's a factor that I've noticed you write sometimes long comments on blogs? I love long detailed comments, but I know it could be overwhelming/time-consuming to answer for others. Bloggers are more likely to answer shorter comments I would think(even though it is less effort for you). I'm not trying to change who you are, just a piece of advice ( :

      Well the word verification turned off has given so far 1 spam comment, and lots of comments this week, so happy days here ( :

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  20. This is a great post, especially for any bloggers out there who are just starting out and getting a bit down by a lack of comments on their blog.

    You're right about the blogosphere - all "how to blog" blogs and tips all state that commenting on other blogs is the best way to get people to notice yours. As there's the etiquette within the blogosphere to always reciprocate. I'm an advocate of that, but I don't just post comments just to get hits/comments. I'll post comments on things I want to post comments on. I started blogging because I wanted to blog and didn't care about comments. It's just a nice bonus. Though the nicer bonus is when you get the same people coming back and you build a nice sense of community and friendship.

    I guess maybe if your blog is solely up there for monetization purposes then you need a constant flow of hits and interaction on it. But if you're just doing it for yourself (like I do) then ... not too important. Just, like I said, a nice bonus.

    Excellent post!

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    1. @Jaina: I like that approach of commenting as a bonus, and writing as the main thing.

      Reciprocating comments as an etiquette and a way of supporting our blogger friends is one way to look at the blogosphere. As long as it doesn't become buisnesslike, systematic, and unemotional.

      I don't have any adverts on my blog, because I have no interest in making money from blogging. Is a hobby for me, not a source of income ( :

      ps woohoo! 50 comments, guys!

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    2. I feel the same way about ads, but since WordPress launched the WordAds that is automatically built in to your blog without you having to do anything, I figure why not? Fortunately they don't mess with your layout.

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  21. While i would like to say my blog is totally for me, in the beginning i was kind of desperate to get followers. Although now that i have more bloggers frequently leaving me comments its not such a big deal. Still whenever i see a comment from a new person i get a little bit excited

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    1. @DWC: I know the feeling, we all start with zero followers!
      Particularly those movie blogs who at first don't know about the LAMB community I think struggle to get regular comments.
      There's no shame in wanting to be noticed and liked, who doesn't! You just have to learn to be happy on your own, when you're not being noticed as well ( :

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  22. Well Chris, obviously it's the fear of every blogger. And see, when you blog about 'em you get a ton of comments! :D

    In the beginning, I'm used to having zero response on my posts, so even having 2-3 comments truly made my day! I do treasure comments and try to respond to each and every single one of them as much as possible. I even try to find out the person's name if I could so it's more personable.

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    1. @Ruth: Is subjective how we perceive commenting. I think the trick is not to fear zero comments. I would admit it is a little extreme to have 50+ and my next music post has zero comments.
      I'm trying not to worry about comments anymore, if they happen good, if they don't, no big deal. I love comments as much as the next man, but I don't want to be dependent on them. Though my blog would probably die if I got 50 zero's in a row!
      ps Thanks Ruth for also sharing your views about ads!

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  23. Wow, you really got people talking and of course I had to comment too. I too think it's something that every blogger thinks about. Of course you will visit other blogs to check them out after they have left a comment, I think it is a great way to find new great blogs. As long as the comment is actually meaningful I really don't mind. If they are just one word I will delete them and not visit the blog.

    I really enjoy getting comments (always love reading them), but I also enjoy seeing how many people sign up for updates through email for example. Even though the number of people that comment is sometimes low for specific articles (for example ones about documentaries) it really doesn't matter. I enjoy the writing and if even one person watches a movie because of it then that's great.

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    1. @Nostra: indeed you can't NOT think about commenting, if you are in that world.
      A good way to get recommendations (or warnings what to avoid) out there!
      Also agree a great way to find new blogs with a similar taste, and make new friends ( :

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  24. This post is such a relief to me, not because I get zero comments, but because I have a really hard time leaving comments unless something really strikes a chord. And yet, all of the "How-To-Make-A-Good-Blog" posts that I have read talk about how essential comments are, that you have to run around leaving comments on everyone's posts incessantly, to the point where I felt like some days I had to decide between doing my "comment" duties and actually having a quality post on my own blog.

    The problem was that sometimes the weight of feeling like I had to leave comments everywhere felt more stressful than the joy I would receive when they commented back, especially when it felt like they too were doing it just to get comments... an endless circle. In the end --or at least where I am now-- I realized that the comments that meant the most to me were the ones that felt like someone had legitimately been moved by my post, so I try to do the same, commenting less to put points on the board and more when something really surprises or pleases me.

    I have often thought that someone should do an alternate "how to" guide for bloggers, looking at the accepted standard for each point and showing the benefits of doing the opposite. And then let each individual decide which mode works best for them. We might actually end up with a more interesting diversity of blogs that way!

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    1. @NeverTooEarlyMP: Happy you enjoyed reading, thanks for sharing your thoughts on this!
      Does feel uncomfortable not paying back the favour and leaving a comment on the other blog, and is indeed difficult to force yourself to leave a comment, if there is no interest in the post.

      The etiquette within the blogosphere is supposedly "paying back the comment" , but we each have to find a limit to how many blogs we comment on, because it can easily get out of hand, so it feels like work. Some are able to follow 50 blogs with no stress, others may prefer to follow 10 sites. It all depends what you want to get out of comments, because 10 good friends may be preferable over 50 you hardly know. You don't have to agree with everything a blogger friend says, but if you have nothing in common, I think it smells like someone trying to get any comments back.

      I also think the more a blogger posts on his/her site, the more you feel pressure of "comments duty". I only blog once a week for this reason, so I and my readers can breath, and have a few days to comment.

      Yes, the comments where you feel the commenter has actually read the article and has something to add are the best, but to me any supportive comments are better than zero.
      An alternative "how to" guide for bloggers, I'd read that for sure! I guess my article is a small contribution in that direction ( :

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  25. Wise (VISIT MY BLOG) words Chris, I couldn't (VISIT MY BLOG) agree more. Definitely (VISIT MY BLOG) food for thought (VISIT MY BLOG).
    I hope I don't (VISIT MY BLOG) become obsessed with comments (VISIT MY BLOG), even though they (VISIT MY BLOG)do make my days sometimes (VISIT MY BLOG).
    I think being overly aware of comments can only hamper your focus and possibly detract from the quality of your posts. I always spend more time on my actual articles than on trying to get some traffic going, which I think shows in my case given that I get a small amount of comments in comparison to other juggernauts of the blogosphere. Not that I think any less of all of my blogging friends for having so much traffic, it's just not something I'm aiming for, I just visit blogs like these to get a different perspective from a fellow cinephile and hopefully learn a little.....(VISIT MY BLOG).

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    1. @Niels: ha ha, I thought that was a spam comment from a moment or two there, you fooled me. I'm glad you can laugh at commenting, because shouldn't be so deadly serious all the time.
      I didn't actually "try" and "aim" for lots of traffic for this post, just kind of appealed to everyone I guess, because all bloggers have an opinion about commenting. Thanks for joining in! I am with you that more effort should be put into the writing than trying to get some traffic going...if the content is rubbish, nobody will want to read it anyway in the long run.

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